Home » Culture Commentary » Seven Difficulties Health Care Workers Face to Fight Ebola

Seven Difficulties Health Care Workers Face to Fight Ebola

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As a nurse, I am one of the many who wishes to run toward Ebola. Don’t credit us with too much courage. We of all people know how manageable Ebola is and how few health care workers get it when good precautions are used and how many fewer die when given good treatment. Ebola is not as dangerous as advertised.

We see how many will die in West Africa if no one runs toward the explosion. In our protective gear, we are quite safe from contracting Ebola unlike the people of West Africa are in danger with about 70% of the infected dying. With the total cases now crossing 10,000 and a bleak future ahead if nothing changes, we feel the urgency to go.

With the new quarantines in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, and Florida, it is becoming increasingly difficult. There is a presumption on health care workers that our time and resources are acceptable sacrifices so that Americans can feel safe from their irrational fears. While West Africa is in serious danger, America is not. Even if 1000 sick patients got in a plane today and flew to every major American city, the outbreak would be under control within a few weeks.

The very first case of a nurse returning to the U. S. from an Ebola ward shows how needlessly aggressive the quarantining of health care workers can be. She was not treated as a kind person who took a risk for others and more like a  criminal waiting for the DA to charge her.

I don’t believe the public at large understands the sorts of barriers we face in getting to West Africa.

I hope to show you the difficulties I have faced in my own attempt to go to Liberia so that you can see that our help should not be presumed upon. We are not asking for your support as much as we ask that you not stand in our way.

1. The Fear for my Family

My greatest fear in all this is to come home and give Ebola to one of my kids. This is a remote possibility and a devastating one. It weighs so much on me that I plan on not returning home for the 21 days I could be infectious.

Lest I be accused of being hypocritical, I am not returning home because I can’t avoid close physical contact with my kids or my wife. It’s hard to avoid close contact with the lady sleeping in my bed or the kids climbing in my lap. I plan on returning to work (I have a phone job, so no close physical contact there either) and resuming my normal life. The public is at a minimal/non-existent risk and my life is not terribly inconvenienced.

Additionally, I will be checking my temperature multiple times a day and would promptly report a fever to the authorities. It is entirely possible I will be hospitalized with full protective gear for a minor stomach bug, but so be it.

2. The Fears of my Family

The next greatest weight we carry is the fear of those who love us. They mean well and wish for us to be safe. Of course, if I were sick with Ebola, my family would hope someone who had the resources and knowledge to help would come from far away to help me. I am hoping to be that person for someone else’s son or sister or mother or friend.

Their concern is not crazy. This is a dangerous disease. I don’t fear for myself because I am not in particular danger, but I understand their concern.

3. The Financial Pressure

When I go, I will be using my vacation time to do it. In fact, to even take three weeks of vacation time is difficult for my employer. I can’t support a house payment and our other expenses while taking significant time off. In addition, I am adding some expenses even though most NGOs pay for the travel and expenses there. Who will shovel my driveway when it snows? There are countless little things that need to be attended to while I am gone.

4. Work Pressures

My employer has been very understanding of my trip. Even so, many of my coworkers aren’t thrilled with the idea that someone who has been near Ebola will be working in the cube next to them. I suspect that I will given a wide berth when I arrive back.

Additionally, I feel that because people would be concerned that I should alert them that I have been to an Ebola hit country. I don’t want them to wonder if they should have shaken hands with me. They should be afforded the courtesy of making that decision for themselves even if I am comfortable with it.

 5. Public Pressures

Many health care workers have been afforded a return from West Africa like the Vietnam Veterans received. Many are thankful for their sacrifice and a vocal and frightened few are quite vicious to the nurse who was needlessly quarantined in New Jersey.  Here are several choice examples just posted in the comments from the link above:

Nurse Medusa with the outdated snake hair,showing her true liberal democrat selfish roots.

Then Jesus said, ‘How selfish of you to care for the afflicted at risk of your own life. And how dare you complain about unwarranted ill treatment on your return. You must be a liberal. I hate you’.

If she was a responsible health provider, who respects her profession and her fellow Americans, she would have quarantined herself for 1 month before stepping on a plane home. Isolation is a key factor when trying to contain an epidemic, one does not have to work in the health sciences field to figure that out. Selfish and ignorant!

I now see the Kaci is going by private carrier to her home in Maine where she will “self quarantine”. A small part of me hopes she develops Ebola, and like the Dallas nurse recovers fully.

Additionally, we are treated like public property. There is no great discussion of the rights of these workers. As a libertarian myself, I have been stunned at the lack of discussion of the civil liberties of the health care community. We are not a resource or commodity, we are human beings.

6. The Difficulty of Even Getting To West Africa

It is not small feat to get the time to do the CDC training and get over to West Africa. While many of the NGOs pay for the travel, it is a lot of time and phone calls to even get to that point. We, like all of you, have busy lives with many responsibilities. Getting to West Africa is no small feat.

7. The Uncertainty of How the Government will Treat Us

When I take off in that plane to go to West Africa, at any moment the policy of Minnesota or the Federal Government could change requiring me to be quarantined for three additional weeks on my return. It would be a serious financial burden on my family if this happened.

A week ago, I might have agreed to go through JFK or Newark airport once I returned, now I will specifically request to avoid these airports to avoid the quarantines that have been placed there. There is even talk of health care community of flying into Toronto and driving home to avoid these onerous requirements.

Should I go?

As you can see, there are many barriers to going to serve these patients. I don’t want applause for this, I simply don’t want to be hindered. A few more roadblocks and, in the name of public safety, I will be prevented from going at all.

If we don’t go to help those in West Africa, this outbreak will spread and grow. Do you think that if Ebola exploded in Guatemala it would be contained well there. Wouldn’t it then march into Mexico and start walking across our own border there? The only way the U. S. will be safe from Ebola is if it is stopped where it is.

Without the aid of U. S. health care volunteers, it will never be stopped in West Africa. For their safety and for your safety, please let us go unhindered and return without barriers placed before us. If we don’t go, who will?

-Chip

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One thought on “Seven Difficulties Health Care Workers Face to Fight Ebola

  1. Pingback: Would an Ebola Quarantine Help? | Life, The Universe, and Everything

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